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Delta Sigma Theta presents ‘I Had a Dream’

Staff Writer

Published: Monday, February 20, 2012

Updated: Tuesday, February 21, 2012 16:02

Dream

Pacer Photos/Chanekqua Watson

The entire cast posed for a photo after the play on February 8, 2012 in Watkins Auditorium. In center, Writer and Director, Patrice Boyd.

Dream

Pacer Photos/Chanekqua Watson

Symphony Johnson, Marshea Meeks and April Wilson perform a scene in the play.

The Eta Xi chapter of Delta Sigma Theta launched the celebration of Black History Month on February 8 in Watkins Auditorium. Their play entitled, "I Had a Dream," was full of entertainment, historical facts and an appreciation for black history.

A warm welcome was given by Soror Ivory Brown and was followed by a musical selection by the adorable and talented Martin Children's Choir. Next, the UTM Dance Ensemble gave a special performance. These talented students performed an African dance that was very graceful, yet energetic.

    After much anticipation, the play finally started. Sorors April Wilson (Harriet), Marshea Meeks (April) and Symphony Johnson (Martina) were introduced in the first act. The plot was centered around Martina, a young lady who did not appreciate her black history and did not have a desire to study for the black history trivia contest with Harriet and April.

Harriet, who is her sister, made a very thought-provoking comment, "You can never forget where you come from." She then recited a poem that moved the crowd, "If Dr. King Were Alive Today." The play takes a shift when Martina falls asleep while watching 106 & Park and Diggy Simmons, played by Reed Chandler, appears in her living room. Martina is obviously fascinated by pop culture, but Diggy was there to teach her a thing or two.

    Some of UTM's beloved students played talented African-Americans who convinced Martina to appreciate her black history. Among the celebrities that were portrayed were Barack Obama, Maya Angelou, Bill Cosby, Mo'nique, Muhammad Ali, Beyonce' and MTV's head news reporter Sway Calloway. In the end, Martina learns that someone had to pave the way for the celebrities and public figures we know and love today.

She grows an appreciation for her black history and is motivated to study for the black history trivia contest. Harriet walks in the room shocked about Martina's changed attitude. Martina then leaves Harriet and the rest of the crowd with her explanation coming from the infamous words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., "I had a dream."

    Soror Mikai Banks gave the closing remarks to the crowd, and a gift was presented to the play's writer and director, Soror Patrice Boyd.

"The DST black history program was one of my favorite events of the year. For one, I love black history and appreciated how they portrayed successful African-Americans. It was nice to see the creative works of this sorority and other eager individuals come together to put on this production. It was something that I will never forget and I am happy that I saw," said Arionna Hayes, a freshman Communications major.

    "A lot of preparation went into producing the play and putting everything together to form the black history program. We had to contact the UTM Dance Ensemble as well as the children's choir who participated. There were also several practices held with the cast to rehearse lines. There was a props crew and a crew who directed traffic as the program was about to start," said Soror

Jennie McFerren, a senior Psychology major. "Although, organizing this production was hectic and a bit stressful, I was very satisfied with the outcome. I was glad the audience enjoyed it and was able to get a good laugh, while being informed at the same time about key African-Americans who helped pave the way. I would like to thank Patrice Boyd who wrote and directed the play and the ladies of DST who helped as well."

    Those who were not in attendance missed out on a treat. It was a time to reflect and be proud of the accomplishments of African-Americans from the past and present.

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